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2024 Elections: Alan Kyeremanten Joins Former CPP Flagbearer, Abu Sakara, Others in New Alliance

The coalition, which would specifically be called the "Alliance for Revolutionary Change" would be launched later this month on Wednesday, April 17.

Movement for Change leader,  Alan Kyeremanten, has joined forces with former CPP flagbearer, Dr. Michael Abu Sakara Foster to form a coalition with other political entities and individuals in hopes of breaking the NPP/NDC duopoly.

The coalition, which would specifically be called the “Alliance for Revolutionary Change” would be launched later this month on Wednesday, April 17.

“The Alliance will aggressively mobilize Ghanaians from across the country, particularly the Youth and Women, irrespective of their religious, political, and ethnic affiliations, in a grand coalition to elect the first Independent Candidate as the President of Ghana,” they said in a statement on Thursday, signaling revolutionary rhetoric.

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Abu Sakara joins the alliance with a political civil society coalition that he heads, known as the National Interest Movement (NIM). He was the candidate of the Convention People’s Party (CPP) for the 2012 presidential elections.

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Mr Kyeremanten, on the other hand, resigned from the ruling New Patriotic Party in September last year to contest as an independent candidate in the 2024 presidential elections, citing excessive monetization of the party’s internal elections as well as unfair treatment for both him and his supporters.

Should their coalition succeed in winning the December election, they would form an “all-inclusive Government of National Unity with representation from political parties, academics, the business community, farmers, faith-based organisations, traditional authorities,” among others.

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The Alliance also promises to adopt “a National Development Plan which will go beyond Party Manifestoes and constitute the Blueprint for Ghana’s economic transformation” and advocate for fundamental Constitutional Reforms in other areas such as the public sector.

If successful, the two major political parties would have to work hard to have a one-off win in the December elections. Ghana’s presidential election requires the winner to obtain more than 50% of valid votes cast

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