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National Curriculum Council Introduces QR Codes in Textbooks

Learners would have to download a special QR Code Scanner that would be used to verify whether the material has been approved by NaCCA or not.

The National Council for Curriculum and Assessment (NaCCA) has begun introducing QR codes in instructional materials used in basic and senior high schools as part of an authenticity check against ‘sub-par’ teaching materials.

“A textbook without a QR code means that it has not been approved by NaCCA and, therefore, might not be suitable for use by our learners in school,” said NaCCA’s Director-General, Professor Edward Appiah.

Learners would have to download a special QR Code Scanner that would be used to verify whether the material has been approved by NaCCA or not.

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“The QR Code Scanner aligns with NaCCA’s commitments to promoting quality and effective education delivery and improving learning outcomes at the pre-tertiary level (KG 1 –SHS3). This QR Code Scanner allows schools, teachers, parents, publishers and the general public to verify the status of instructional materials and ascertain in real time whether the material has received NaCCA’s approval,” a statement said.

The move also appears to be part of regulatory efforts to drown out materials with debatable ideas. For instance last year a book about the history of Ghana meant for primary 4 pupils caused a bit of a commotion when authors (Francis Benjamin Appiah and Henry David Appiah) wrote that “Christianity and religion” have been the cause of poverty in Ghana and Africa.

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