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Wahu Mobility Opens Ghana’s First Electric Vehicle Assembly Plant

With over 100 bikes in its inventory, Wahu is actively localizing its knock-down assembly line and accelerating the production of various components. The company's goal is to achieve 50-80% parts localization within the next 18 months.

Wahu Mobility, the electric bike manufacturer, has opened its first electric vehicle (EV) assembly plant in Accra, the capital of Ghana. It is also the first of its kind in West Africa.

With over 100 bikes in its inventory, Wahu is actively localizing its knock-down assembly line and accelerating the production of various components. The company’s goal is to achieve 50-80% parts localization within the next 18 months.

With electric bikes offering an eco-conscious solution to urban mobility, Ghana is taking strides to join Africa’s electric vehicle movement.

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The co-founder and CEO of the e-mobility brand, Valeri Larbi, told CNN that the assembly plant has the capacity to build about 200 e-bikes per month. She added that the vision is to steer away from petrol-filled bikes and instead manufacture electric bikes for a sustainable Africa, aiming for 30 million delivery riders across the continent by 2030.

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“It really kind of struck me that I didn’t want the mobility to be fulfilled by petrol motorbikes. By 2030, there will be 30 million delivery riders across Africa and it just made me think, as a continent, we are more conscious around becoming sustainable and moving to net zero,” Larbi said.

The CEO also shared that Wahu Mobility’s e-bikes are tailored to match Ghana’s infrastructure and road conditions.

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Furthermore, in a bid to assist drivers in switching to electric vehicles, the company provides a payment plan to help cover expenses.

Larbi is confident in the company’s ability to scale up production to 2,000 bikes per month and forge partnerships across Africa, while also extending sales to Europe, Asia, and other markets through strategic maneuvers.

“A lot of production has to happen in Asia, so looking at how we localize components is a huge opportunity for local artisans. We can scale this facility up to 2,000 bikes a month.” She said.

Larbi also disclosed that Wahu Mobility has already begun selling its e-bikes in Togo, established partnerships in East Africa, and is currently exploring opportunities in North African markets.

Looking ahead, within the next two years, she aims to make her company’s e-bikes accessible in the majority of major cities across the continent.

The Head of Technology of Wahu Mobility, Ian Mbote, said he sees more opportunities as their vehicle plugs into the needs of Zimbabwean and South African markets.

“The demand has been really high,” Wahu Mobility’s Head of Technology Ian Mbote shared. “Our vehicle not only plugs into the needs of a Ghanaian customer. It plugs into the needs of a South African customer, a Zambian customer. And this is why I see vast opportunities,” he said.

“Wahu,” derived from the Dagbani word for “horse,” launched in 2022 through a collaboration between Ghanaian entrepreneurs Valerie Labi and Toni Heigl, along with German automotive expert Peter Schwarzenbauer.

Their electric bike boasts a dual-swappable battery, providing a range of up to 140 kilometers and a top speed of 33 kilometers per hour.

Equipped with features like a tracking device, battery management system and smart lock accessible via a mobile app, the bike offers versatility for riders with pedal assistance and throttle options.

With a capacity to carry loads up to 150 kilograms, it caters to various riding styles and preferences, aiming to expand its presence across major cities in Africa.

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