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The History and Origins of the Ghana Month

The very nature of this month elicits discussions and events that often seek to highlight Ghana's achievements since independence, suggest ways to resolve or overcome challenges, and identify and harness opportunities for the nation's future.

“It’s Ghana month!”.

That’s a phrase that you will hear quite frequently on television and radio from the last week of February. I guarantee that you will continue to hear it several times a day as we navigate the month of March. Indeed, March is special to the country Ghana because it was on the 6th of this month some 67 years ago (i.e. 6th March, 1957) that Ghana gained independence.

Dr. Kwame Nkrumah proclaimed the famous words, “Ghana, your beloved country is free forever”. Thus, every March, Ghana celebrates its Independence Day with pride, pomp and pageantry. But what exactly is Ghana Month, and how did this tradition originate?

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As the name suggests, the Ghana Month is a month-long festival driven primarily by the media. It is believed to have begun in the 1980s, that is, about 23 years after Ghana had gained independence. In the years following independence, Ghanaians sought ways to keep the spirit of national pride alive. Thus, the idea of dedicating a month to celebrating Ghana’s rich heritage, cultural identity, and hard-earned freedom gained traction. In recent times, the Ghana month has been referred to as “Heritage Month” and is being reshaped by several innovative ideas from Ghanaians from all walks of life.


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The Ghana Month has become an important part of the country’s national life and probably one that is here to stay forever. The purpose of the month is to honour our cultural heritage, promote local businesses and reflect on our progress and the future.

  •  Honouring Ghanaian Culture

In this month, traditional music, dance, and cuisine take centre stage. Media outlets showcase these aspects of Ghanaian culture through special programming and events, fostering a sense of national identity.

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  •  Promoting Local Businesses

As a way to promote local businesses, the “Buy Ghana” campaigns encourage Ghanaians to patronise locally produced goods and services. This aims to strengthen the national economy and contribute to our journey of becoming self-reliant as a nation. Initiatives such as “Wear Ghana” encourages Ghanaians all over the world to patronise local fabrics to boost the local textile industry.

• Reflecting on Progress and the Future

The very nature of this month elicits discussions and events that often seek to highlight Ghana’s achievements since independence, suggest ways to resolve or overcome challenges, and identify and harness opportunities for the nation’s future.

Recently, efforts to promote Ghanaian culture and history have extended beyond our national borders, with initiatives like the “Year of Return” in 2019, inviting people of African ancestry from around the globe to visit Ghana to commemorate the anniversary of the arrival of enslaved Africans in America.

The Ghana month will forever mark the beginning of a turning point for not just Ghana alone but the entire continent just as it inspired other African nations in their own quests for self-rule.

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